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When I asked my sister at what time she and the kids needed to be at the airport she told me we would have enough time if we left at half five in the morning. Not looking forward to a very short night and a long, busy day ahead of me, I set my alarm for the nighttime start of today.

I got up, woke the sleeping Germans and made a pot of tea … my normal choice of morning stimulants. With a lot of hussel and bussel going on around me I waited till everyone was ready to go and then piled  up the car with bags, suitcases and very sleepy children. As I dropped them off at the airport, one eye on the clock I saw that time had advanced much faster then I thought, but we were still on time.

Still feeling warm from all the good-bye hugs and kisses I watched as the trio passed through glass sliding doors and I drove off feeling a mixture of sadness and relief. What I didn’t know was that due to a combination of much too long bag-drop-off queues, to few and very unhelpful flight assistants and the utter lack of speakers my sister and her kids were told they could board the plane but their bags would be left behind. After all that shopping not an option so my family missed their flight home.

As I drove back to the airport I started wondering about time and how we measure it. As I have gotten older time passes so much quicker than it did when I was a kid, I remember the year between birthdays and Christmases being unbearably long. Now it seems they crop every few months or so. And why is it that when something captures your attention or you are enjoying yourself completely an hour passes by in five minutes but when you are waiting for a bus to arrive the five minutes you are standing there feels like days?

Research shows that our brain processes time in relation to our age, so a year is never-ending when you are three, but at thirty it just flies past. And if we keep or brain active, by being busy or doing things that engage us body, mind and soul our brain is too occupied to keep us thinking about something as mundane as a minutes, hence flies because we forget about it.

It also seems that there are all sorts of “times”, each depending on who our brain process what is happening. For instance when we are stressed, have lots on our plate we are in “mind time”. That means that are brain is coping with all the stuff going on but we are not emotionally processing it. Sadly that means when we slow down and try to forget all the stress of the day our brains switch over to “emotional time” and we feel all the fear, anger and stress that we suppressed earlier.

As i can’t go back in time and change what happened this morning (even if my sister is more than just annoyed) I am going to enjoy the additional time I get to spend with my family, see it as a gift and not waste the extra time given.

As I write this my mind wanders to a lovely children’s book I read when i was 12/13. It was called Momo or The Gentlemen in Grey (also known as The Men in Grey) by Michael Ende. the story is about time and how you use it. It is a beautiful story and well worth a read even as an Adult

Momo

The Psychology of Time

Time-Shifting

As I write this my mind wanders to a lovely children’s book I read when i was 12/13. It was called Momo or The Gentlemen in Grey (also known as The Men in Grey) by Michael Ende. the story is about time and how you use it. It is a beautiful story and well worth a read even as an Adult

Momo

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